Seven Directions Mandala

An encaustic mandala painting "Seven Directions Mandala" by Janet Fox with rainbow colors
Seven Directions Mandala | encaustic mixed media

Seven Directions Mandala

Sometime in the 1990’s, I went to a workshop to learn how to make a seven-sided drum head. A Native American man led the workshop and shared a beautiful story of a quest. Each side of the drum head represented one day in the story. Although I no longer recall his story exactly, it influenced my version…

Once upon a dreamtime, a very curious girl was outside, dancing freely and twirling around in her secret garden. She spent many hours there, tending to the flowers, herbs, vegetables, fruit, and all the creatures living there. The girl loved to bathe in the aroma of the sweet flowers, run through the basil, dill and thyme, and gently crumple the rich soil between her fingers before planting seeds.

After many days and nights, she became restless. She wondered what was beyond the garden. Leaving the garden she loved and knew so well was scary. But something was calling to her, so she called up her courage and prepared for her journey to find what was calling – to find a treasure.

On the first day, she heard an infant cooing, so she followed her to the east, all the way to the sea, but she did not find the treasure.

Next, on the second day, she followed a little girl to the west, over the farthest and highest mountains. But the treasure was not there, either.

Then on the third day, she met a fierce maiden, and together, they went to the north, over the frozen tundra and icy glaciers. Once again, they did not find the treasure.

Now on the fourth day, she saw a great commotion and in the middle, found a bride. Together, they went south and through the great tropical forests to the farthest point possible. They looked and looked, but they did not find the treasure there.

On the fifth day, she came upon a mother. Together, they flew up, through the clouds, past the moon and the sun and stars and back. No matter how far they went, they could not find the treasure.

But she would not give up. On the sixth day, she met an old grandmother in the shadow of a tree by the seaside. They went down, under the sea and to the bottom of the deepest ocean canyons and caves. But after all of the swimming and searching, they still did not find the treasure.

The seventh dawned and the girl was very discouraged. She had gone in every direction she knew of to find the treasure and didn’t know where else to turn. Then in the middle of the garden, in the tall grasses, she noticed a Scarlet Boa. She had seen it before from afar, but during all her time exploring in the garden, she had not found the courage to look at it up close. Mustering all of her energy, the girl gazed at it and soon noticed its beautiful skin of smooth scales in all shades of red, rose, and burgundy.

While the girl did not know it, the Scarlet Boa had been with her on all of her travels, watching over her for her safety. She began to understand that it was her spirit animal, her friend and protector. As the girl watched, the scarlet boa began dancing and twisting around in circles. She was mesmerized and lost track of its tail… and then she realized that was because it was swallowing it!

Suddenly, she knew exactly where to turn to find her treasure. There was one more direction yet to go, one that she hadn’t even thought of to explore.

The girl closed her eyes, quieted her mind, and began counting her breaths in and out. At first, it was quiet and dark but as her eyes adjusted, she began to see the tiniest pinpoint of light coming from a place deep within. As she ventured toward it, the light very gradually grew in size, beckoning her to come closer. As the girl did so, she was overcome by a loving warmth, the greatest peacefulness she had ever experienced. For she had discovered her treasure; it was inside of her all along. At last, she had discovered her center, and she was at home.

Finding “Home” within

Does this story resonate with you? In my experience, I’ve had many times when I didn’t know what to do, so I looked outward for guidance. I spent many days, months, and years looking. But somewhere along the way, someone asked me to hold up my hand and point to the place where I’d look next. And then, as my index finger pointed outward, they asked me what my other three fingers were doing.

Those other three fingers pointed back at me, directly towards my own center. Ah-haaa!

Looking internally, I began to discover the wondrous, mysterious world of my dreams. That was a long time ago and my dream explorations have been so lively and rich, with many ah-ha moments, especially when sharing with a friend or within a trusted dream group. I’ve also enjoyed dialoging with and honoring my dreams, especially through making art (many examples which are on this site). And although my dreams have personal meanings and significance, I’ve also learned that others taking on one of my dreams-as if it were there own-can find their own ah-ha’s. And I’ve discovered my own ah-ha’s when I’ve taken on their dreams, too. I feel so alive when this happens!

Snake images, often scarlet in color, have been a part of my dream world for many years. Once I get over the surprise and fear of the symbol, I often become lucid – aware that I’m dreaming while doing so. This awareness can allow me the freedom to interact within the dream. Snakes are ancient creatures and symbols. According to Wikipedia researchers, snakes in the ouroboros form – a circle or figure 8 allowing it to swallow its own tail – also symbolize eternity, the cycle of birth and death, the unity of all things, and more.

What is a mandala?

According to Wikipedia, in common use, mandala has become a generic term for any diagram, chart or geometric pattern that represents the cosmos metaphysically or symbolically; a microcosm of the universe. Carl Jung Resources describes mandala as “a graphical representation of the center, (or Self), which can appear in dreams and visions or it can be created spontaneously by drawing.” It’s easy to get absorbed in making a mandala – figuring out symmetry, adding symbols, filling in shapes with colors and details.

Besides thinking of the story above, my art is loosely inspired by the amazing detailed temple murals by Shashi Dhoj Tulachan at the Bowers Museum in Anaheim, California. If you’re in the area, stop by to see the ongoing exhibit, Sacred Realms: Temple Murals by Shashi Dhoj Tulachan From the Gayle and Edward P. Roski Collection.

About Seven Directions Mandala

Seven Directions Mandala is an original encaustic painting, with pastel, shellac, and ink. I enjoy the garden, flowers, and energy in this story. The seven sections are for each direction, and the colors represent the energy chakra regions of a human. Somehow, all of these ideas came together for me in this painting. What do you see in it? Enjoy!

 For information about viewing or purchasing this artwork, contact Janet Fox.

Updated October 13, 2019

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